Sat | Aug 19, 2017

Scores benefit from inaugural Church of Jesus Christ event

Published:Tuesday | August 30, 2016 | 8:00 AM
Team members of the Church of Jesus Christ in Whitehouse who were instrumental in the staging of the inaugural health fair.

The Church of Jesus Christ in Whitehouse, Westmoreland, recently staged its inaugural health fair at the Seaview Community Centre, under the theme 'Ready, Set, Glow from Head to Toe.'

Scores of community members turned out for the event and were catered to by a large team of health professionals from private practice and the public-health system, including general practitioners, gynaecologists, paediatricians, optometrists, nutritionists, social workers, health-education officers and nurses.

The Mandeville and Cornwall regional hospitals, the Westmoreland Health Department, the National Council on Drug Abuse, Optical Illusion in Mandeville, and the National Health Fund were among the event's partners.

 

GENERAL CHECK-UPS

 

For more than six hours, the professionals conducted body mass index calculations, blood pressure and sugar tests, gynaecological examinations, electrocardiograms (ECG), immunisation, vision screenings, and general check-ups.

Most areas of health concerns were addressed on the spot, while others were referred to the hospital or specialists for further attention as needed. There were lectures on issues such as waste disposal, carnal abuse, and parental neglect, along with their resultant impacts on society.

More than 300 persons, including children and the elderly, were examined by health personnel. Persons came from the communities of Culloden, Farm, Bluefields, Mearnsville, Congress, Longhill, Fustic Grove, Petersville, Beeston Spring, and Bronte.

"Some of the elderly had so much difficulty moving around that the nurses just went to them at their seats to check their vitals," said Sophia Spencer, who spoke on behalf of the medical team. The patronage was so overwhelming that at the scheduled cut-off time of 4 p.m., many persons were waiting to see the doctors. The doctors, who obviously enjoyed what they were doing, gladly obliged and ensured that everyone was attended to."

"The health fair was a remarkable success. The level of collaboration between the church and the various agencies was not only unprecedented, but was also commendable," continued Spencer. "It is difficult to imagine why so many doctors closed their private practice or gave up their free time to render free service at the health fair, but they did. It is also remarkable that the church was able to attract more than 300 participants from the general community, cutting across all real or perceived barriers."