Fri | Jul 28, 2017

Airline suspends flights amid Ebola

Published:Wednesday | July 30, 2014 | 7:00 AM
Dr. Kent Brantly (left) treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia.
This photo provided by the CDC shows an ebola Virus. U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote.
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MONROVIA, (AP):

Police officers deployed to Liberia's international airport to ensure passengers are screened for Ebola symptoms as a major regional airline announced yesterday it was suspending flights to cities hardest hit by an outbreak that has killed more than 670 people.

A 40-year-old American man of Liberian descent who worked for the West African nation's finance ministry died Friday in Nigeria after taking several flights on ASKY Airlines. At the time, Liberian authorities said they had not been requiring health checks of departing passengers in Monrovia.

"We have a presence of the police at the airport to enforce what we're doing," said Binyah Kesselly, chairman of the Liberia Airport Authority board. "So if you have a flight and you are not complying with the rules, we will not allow you to board."

Patrick Sawyer's sister had died of Ebola though he maintained he had not had close physical contact with her when she was sick. He took an ASKY Airlines flight from Liberia to Ghana, then on to Togo and eventually to Nigeria where he was immediately taken into quarantine until his death Friday.

His travels have caused widespread fear at a time when the outbreak shows no signs of slowing in West Africa, where medical facilities are scarce and where some affected communities have in panic attacked the international health workers trying to help them. The Ebola outbreak has had about a 70 percent fatality rate, and there is no vaccine or specific treatment that can save lives.

In a statement released yesterday, ASKY said it was temporarily halting flights not only to Monrovia but also to Freetown, Sierra Leone. Flights will continue to the capital of the third major country where people have died, Guinea, though passengers departing from there will be "screened for signs of the virus."

Passengers at the airline's hub in Lome, Togo, also will be screened by medical teams, it said.

The World Health Organization said the risk of travellers contracting Ebola is considered low because it requires direct contact with bodily fluids or secretions such as urine, blood, sweat or saliva, experts say. Ebola can't be spread like flu through casual contact or breathing in the same air.

Patients are contagious only once the disease has progressed to the point they show symptoms, according to the WHO. And the most vulnerable are health care workers and relatives who come in much closer contact with the sick. Among those currently hospitalised with Ebola in Liberia are two American health workers.

Still, the early symptoms of Ebola, fever, aches and sore throat, mirror many other diseases including malaria and typhoid, experts say. Only in later stages of Ebola do patients sometimes experience severe internal bleeding and blood coming out of their mouth, eyes or ears.