Wed | Dec 7, 2016

Immigration officials see danger as local cooperation wanes

Published:Wednesday | March 11, 2015 | 12:00 AM
In this March 2, 2015 photo, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers meet in the garage of a New York federal building, as they prepare for a series of early-morning arrests. Immigrant and Customs Enforcement say an increasing number of cities and counties across the United States are limiting cooperation with the agency and putting its officers in dangerous situations as they track down foreign-born criminals. Instead, more of its force is out on the streets, eating up resources and conducting investigations because cities like New York and states like California have passed legislation that limits many of the detention requests issued by immigration authorities.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers escort an arrestee in an apartment building, in the Bronx borough of New York, during a series of early-morning raids yesterday.
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NEW YORK (AP):

Diminished local cooperation is putting federal immigration officers in dangerous situations as they track down foreign-born criminals, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials say.

They say that more of their officers are out on the streets, eating up resources, because cities and states have passed legislation that limits many of the detention requests issued by immigration authorities.

For years, ICE has issued the detainers to local and state law-enforcement agencies, asking them to hold immigrants for up to 48 hours after they were scheduled for release from jail. Most detainees are then either taken into federal custody to face an immigration judge or be deported.

But more than 300 counties and cities, plus California, Connecticut, Illinois, Rhode Island and the District of Columbia, have chosen to release immigrants, claiming too many people who have committed low-level offences or no crime at all were being deported and unnecessarily separated from their families. Courts have said that honouring detainers without probable cause could result in a civil rights offence.

ICE insists that its priorities have changed and it is only focused on foreign-born criminals who are a threat to society. It deported nearly 316,000 people in fiscal year 2014.

In the first eight months of 2014, immigration officers filed roughly 105,000 requests for local enforcement agencies to hold immigrants, but local agencies declined 8,800 of the requests, according to data provided by immigration authorities.

Officers now face more

danger because they can't just pick up foreign-born criminals in a safe environment like the Rikers Island jail, said Christopher Shanahan, field office director for enforcement and removal operations in New York.

"We are in a situation in which we have to provide more men, more workers, more manpower in the streets, where it is more dangerous to take custody of somebody," said Shanahan. "On the street, when you go into a house, a place of employment, when you are arresting somebody, you don't know if they have weapons, you don't know the surroundings."

Last week, an Associated Press reporter and photographer accompanied officers as they conducted a series of early-morning arrests in the Bronx and Manhattan, part of a nationally coordinated operation that netted 2,059 people.