Mon | Sep 25, 2017

No time to lose: Global response to Nepal quake gears up

Published:Monday | April 27, 2015 | 4:01 AM
Members of a German rescue organisation board a plane at the airport in Frankfurt, central Germany, yesterday for their flight to earthquake-torn Nepal.

LONDON (AP):

THERE IS still time to save lives - that's why governments and aid agencies Sunday rushed doctors, volunteers and equipment to Nepal without waiting for the dust to settle.

United Nations spokeswoman Orla Fagan, who is heading to Nepal, said preventing the spread of disease is one of the most important tasks facing aid workers who are arriving.

"There are 14 international medical teams on the way and either 14 or 15 international search-and-rescue teams on the way," she said. "They need to get in as soon as possible. They will use military aircraft to get them into Nepal."

hopeful signs

Substantial logistical hurdles remain, but there were hopeful signs as Kathmandu's international airport reopened after Saturday's crushing earthquake, and some aid vehicles were able to travel overland from India to the stricken Nepalese city of Pokhara.

"That means supplies could potentially come in overland from India. That is a positive sign," said Ben Pickering, Save the Children's humanitarian adviser in Britain. "The airport opening is a small miracle."

He cautioned that chaotic conditions may create a bottleneck at the airport as governments and aid agencies try to bring in personnel and supplies in the coming days.

UNICEF said yesterday that at least 940,000 children in areas affected by the earthquake are in "urgent need" of humanitarian assistance. UNICEF staff reported dwindling water supplies, power shortages and communications breakdowns.

There is still a dearth of information about conditions at the epicentre of the earthquake, Pickering said, and is not clear which roads are passable.

"Going forward it's about access to the epicentre, and helicopters are the key, but it's not clear whether they can be sourced and whether the high altitude is a problem," he said, adding that Save the Children has emergency kits pre-positioned in three warehouses in Nepal and plans to distribute bedding, buckets and other basic supplies to 2,000 families as quickly as possible.