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HAITI: 'We hear helicopters flying overhead, but no aid coming'

Published:Tuesday | October 11, 2016 | 10:46 AM
A United States armed forces helicopter flies past in Dame-Marie, Haiti, yesterday. Nearly a week after Hurricane Matthew smashed into southwestern Haiti.

DAME MARIE, Haiti (AP):
In the most western tip of Haiti, 300 patients with festering wounds lay silently on beds at the main hospital in the seaside village of Dame Marie waiting for medicine a week after Hurricane Matthew hit the remote peninsula.

Among the injured was Beauvoir Luckner, a cobbler and farmer who walked 7 miles in three days after a tree fell on his house, crushing his leg and killing his mother. The leg might have to be amputated, but all doctors can do is clean his wounds because the hospital has run out of everything, including painkillers.

"There's no water, no antibiotics," Dr Herby Jean told The Associated Press. "Everything is depleted ... We hear helicopters flying overhead, but we're not getting anything."

There was also no power and frustration grew on Tuesday as food, medicine and fresh water kept arriving at the main city in Haiti's southwest peninsula but was slow to reach increasingly desperate communities like Dame Marie.

http://www.apexchange.com/Content/preview/2016/20161011/01/0d3b7d84605f4ac58c65dfddd5a47e20.jpg

IN PHOTO: Homes destroyed by Hurricane Matthew stand in Dame-Marie, Haiti, yesterday. Nearly a week after the storm smashed into southwestern Haiti, some communities along the southern coast have yet to receive any assistance, leaving residents who have lost their homes and virtually all of their belongings struggling to find shelter and potable water.  – AP

Luckner lay on a mattress with no sheets and a bandage around his left leg.

"It took a lot of misery to get here and now that I'm here, there's still misery," he said.

Meanwhile, at a cramped police station serving as a makeshift clinic in the nearby town of Marfranc, Darline Derosier fastened IV drips to jail cell bars, wiped the brows of cholera patients and tended to the wounds of those injured in the storm.

She was the only health worker helping about 40 patients inside the station bereft of police as she waited for help to arrive. Among the patients was an elderly woman lying unconscious on a jail cell floor with a leg bandaged in an old rag and a man with gashes around his neck, his eyes fluttering.

"People will die soon if we don't get some aid," an overwhelmed Derosier told the AP.