Tue | Sep 19, 2017

Thais gripped by grief after beloved king's death

Published:Friday | October 14, 2016 | 10:00 AM
Thais cry outside Siriraj Hospital where King Bhumibol Adulyadej was treated in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday. Thailand's Royal Palace said King Bhumibol, the world's longest-reigning monarch, has died at age 88.
AP FILE Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej waves to well-wishers as he returns to Siriraj Hospital after attending a ceremony to celebrate his birthday in Bangkok in December 2010. Thailand's Royal Palace said on yesterday, that Thailand's King Bhumibol, the world's longest-reigning monarch, has died at age 88.
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BANGKOK (AP):

Thais wept in grief across the nation yesterday after the palace announced the death of their beloved King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the country's unifying figure and the world's longest-reigning monarch. He was 88.

Hundreds of people gathered at Bangkok's Siriraj Hospital, where Bhumibol had been treated for a variety of ailments for much of the past decade. Many sobbed loudly, clutching each other in anguish and shouting, "Long live the king."

The government announced a 100-day mourning period and a 30-day moratorium on state events. His son, Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn, is to succeed him on the throne.

"There is no word to explain my feeling right now," Gaewkarn Fuangtong, a humanitarian worker, said in Bangkok's financial district.

"I lost one of the most important people in my life. I feel like I haven't done enough for him. I should have done more. I will do good, do better for his sake."

Most Thais had seen no other king in their lifetime and thought of Bhumibol, who reigned for 70 years, as their father and the embodiment of goodness and godliness.

Although a constitutional monarch, he wielded enormous political power and served as a unifying figure during Thailand's numerous political crises. But in recent years, he suffered from a variety of illnesses that affected his kidneys, brain, lungs, heart and blood.

"Since I was young I saw him work really hard, and now it's hard to explain. I feel numb inside," said Danaiwut Wiroonpiti 26, a photographer who was crying outside the Grand Palace where the king's body will be taken in a procession Friday. "He's the centre of all Thai people. It's like we lost the main pillar of our lives, the person who holds us together. I can't hold my tears."

Portraits of Bhumibol displayed in most Thai homes and businesses often depict him in arduous travels to remote villages, where he often went to see the situation of his subjects first hand.

But recently, whenever Bhumibol appeared in public, he was in wheelchair, waving feebly at his subjects. Even those rare appearances stopped as he became confined to the hospital.