Sat | Aug 19, 2017

Little girls doubt that women can be brilliant, study shows

Published:Friday | January 27, 2017 | 1:00 AM

WASHINGTON (AP):

Can women be brilliant? Little girls are not so sure.

A study published yesterday in the journal Science suggests that girls as young as six can be led to believe that men are inherently smarter and more talented than women, making girls less motivated to pursue novel activities or ambitious careers. That such stereotypes exist is hardly a surprise, but the findings show that these biases can affect children at a very young age.

"As a society, we associate a high level of intellectual ability with males more than females, and our research suggests that this association is picked up by children as young as six and seven," said Andrei Cimpian, associate professor in the psychology department at New York University. Cimpian co-authored the study, which looked at 400 children, ages five to seven.

 

IDEA OF BRILLIANCE

 

In the first part of the study, girls and boys were told a story about a person who is "really, really smart", a child's idea of brilliance, and then asked to identify that person among the photos of two women and two men. The people in the photos were dressed professionally, looked the same age and appeared equally happy. At five, both boys and girls tended to associate brilliance with their own gender, meaning that most girls chose women and most boys chose men.

But as they became older and began attending school, children apparently began endorsing gender stereotypes. At six and seven, girls were "significantly less likely" to pick women. The results were similar when the kids were shown photos of children.

Interestingly, when asked to select children who look like they do well in school, as opposed to being smart, girls tended to pick girls, which means that their perceptions of brilliance are not based on academic performance.