Sat | Dec 10, 2016

JLP lashes PNP apologists

Published:Monday | March 22, 2010 | 12:00 AM

THE JAMAICA Labour Party (JLP) yesterday rallied its supporters to the defence of the Government, arguing that it was under threat from propaganda and orchestrated attempts by people to topple the Golding administration.

Journalists, political commen-tators, lawyers and the opposition People's National Party (PNP) bore the brunt of an assault when the JLP's Area Council One met at the Edith Dalton James High School in Duhaney Park, St Andrew, yesterday.

Dr Peter Phillips, the director of communications in the PNP and former national security minister, was singled out and labelled a pretender by JLP Deputy Leader Desmond McKenzie.

"I am going to say to Dr Phillips, today, he that is without sin, cast the first stone," McKenzie said.

"You can talk as much as you want. If you are without sin, you are OK. I challenge him, you are not lily white as he is (sic) making himself out to be," he added.

Phillips has been the PNP's point man on the extradition matter involving JLP strongman Chris-topher 'Dudus' Coke, who operates out of Golding's West Kingston constituency.

Phillips has argued that Attorney General Dorothy Lightbourne should allow the courts to decide whether Coke should be extradited to the United States. Golding, however, has said that information used by the United States in charging Coke was obtained illegally and that if Lightbourne signs the extradition request under the current circum-stances, she should also sign her resignation letter.

Meanwhile, the JLP deputy leader and mayor of Kingston also blasted members of the media fraternity for "continuing to make apologies for the People's National Party".

"I hear people condemning the prime minister. ... I don't hear one journalist, I don't see one commentator that has asked the question of why the former minister of justice and attorney general allowed an extradition request to remain on his desk, lost in paper and he didn't sign it," McKenzie said.

He was referring to the extradition case file of Presley Bingham, which was on A.J. Nicholson's desk for signing but was never inked.