Sat | Sep 26, 2020

Christmas cheer for Manchester's disabled

Published:Friday | December 24, 2010 | 12:00 AM
Young Women of Purpose (Y-WoP) volunteers and members of 3D Projects for the Disabled, as well as students posing with good neighbours, Burger King, which provided over 100 free meals for the treats.
A student of CCCD shows off his gift.
Caribbean Christian Centre for the Deaf (CCCD) friends sharing in the Christmas spirit. - Photos by Peter Kavanaugh
A happy CCCD student delights in her gift.
Volunteers extend a helping hand to a member of the disabled community at the Y-WoP Christmas treat.
A young student of CCCD enjoys lunch.
Founder of Y-WoP, Lanisia Rhoden handing over a gift to a happy member of Manchester's disabled community.
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Peter Kavanaugh, Contributor

THE YULETIDE spirit of giving was evident at two events in Manchester recently.

At the 52-year-old Caribbean Christian Centre for the Deaf (CCCD), Knockpatrick campus, the enrolled children were treated to a nice lunch, ice-cream and Christmas cake as well as a gift-giving ceremony last Wednesday.

The joy and happiness reflected on the face of each child was heart-warming.

The following day, over at the Manchester Horticultural Showground in Mandeville, a similar activity took place spearheaded by a local non-profit organisation, Young Women of Purpose (Y-WoP), lead by Lanisia Rhoden.

This time, the recipients were drawn from 3D Projects for the disabled, as well as students from a number of schools, such as Cross Keys High and McIntosh Memorial Primary.

Lending support

Y-WoP provides moral support, mentorship and guidance to young women between the ages of 16 and 25 years in Manchester. The foundation is open to persons who need advice in selecting a career path and guidance on the steps to take to achieve it. It also assists persons facing challenges with moral support in overcoming these challenges.

Team members and volunteers include successful young professionals, who provide career guidance and mentorship to young women. Several trained psychologists and social workers are also included to provide specialised treatment where necessary.