Mon | Mar 19, 2018

Jamaican school gets US help

Published:Sunday | December 26, 2010 | 12:00 AM
Jamaica's Honorary Consul to Atlanta Vin Martin (left), with the principal of Teamwork School in Flankers, Montego Bay, Dr Winsome Oban (second left), President of Integrity Children's Fund, Major Karl Chambers (second right), and Marcia Chambers at the Atlanta-based Integrity Children's Fund annual Christmas Benefit Concert organised at the Miller Grove High School in Atlanta, Georgia, recently. - Contributed

A fourth school in Jamaica will benefit from the generosity of the Atlanta-based Integrity Children's Fund (Integrity) to the tune of US$7,000 or J$588,000 per year.

The new school, Teamwork, located in Flankers, Montego Bay, received the first instalment of a cheque for US$3,500 (J$294,000) which was presented to the school's principal, Dr Winsome Oban, by Integrity's president, Major Karl Chambers. The presentation was held at the organisation's annual Christmas benefit concert, held at the Miller Grove High School in Atlanta, Georgia, on Sunday, December 12.

In making the presentation, Major Karl Chambers said, "Integrity Children's Fund is thrilled to lend financial support to Teamwork school, making it four schools that the organisation supports in Jamaica". The funds, he said, will go towards paying salaries and other financial needs.

"Teamwork school - operated by a group of extraordinary persons - is dedicated to serving some of the less fortunate children in St James. Its mandate 'preventing rather than curing', is personified in the execution of duties and the results that come from the success of their students."

Major Chambers said his organisation seeks to improve illiteracy through the provision of resources, as well as promote intellectual and social development. Illiteracy, he said, limits the ability of these teenagers to reason rationally and is a primary factor in some turning to a life of crime.

In accepting the cheque, Teamwork's principal, Dr Winsome Oban, expressed thanks to Integrity for its financial support. She said the school provides a second chance at education for young people who have dropped out of school in St James.

Over the past eight years, the Georgia-based institution has contributed over J$33.6 million or US$400,000 to three schools in Kingston and St Andrew and one in Montego Bay.

-JIS/Washington DC