Youth Focus - On the 'Wright' track

Published: Saturday | October 22, 2011 Comments 0
Peter Wright -  Photo by Sheena Gayle
Peter Wright - Photo by Sheena Gayle

Sheena Gayle, Youth Focus Writer

WESTERN BUREAU:

At 24 years old, Peter Wright is intent on raising the bar of musical excellence with creativity and diversity through an unlikely vessel, hip hop.

While most aspiring Jamaica-born musicians are looking to delve into reggae or dancehall, this soldier of music, who goes by the stage name Five Steez, does not plan on changing the genre even if others think otherwise.

"Music has been not only a source of entertainment for me, but also education and inspiration. I learnt a lot just from listening to music with a message, hearing certain references and researching them later," Steez said

"Hip hop appealed to me like no other genre. I have an appreciation for most genres, especially roots reggae and what people may call neo-soul. But with hip hop, the sound varies so much. It wasn't a box. Musically, it could borrow from jazz, funk, soul, rock and roll, reggae or dancehall and still maintain its identity."

Igniting passion

As Jamaica's ace hip-hop artiste, his vocals ignite the passion to listen, his lyrics dissect issues with simplicity and his message flies beyond the scope of his slim-built frame.

His 35-minute mix tape dubbed The Momentum: Volume Two with DJ Ready Cee has stirred international buzz and has begun to receive widespread airplay in the United States of America.

"I must say, I have found myself through music. Self-expression is one of the most profound ways to know one's self and my music has been very important to me in that regard," Steez shared. "Also, my dedication to music has taught me the value of hard work, focus, discipline, persistence and patience. This energy from my music taught me to strive to the best in everything I do."

Honest, focused, determined, intense and profound are five adjectives that this witty rapper use to describe himself. Steez is a graduate of the University of the West Indies, where he read for his first degree in media and communication.

"My music deals with reality on a whole and I'm usually relating my own experiences or that of my family and peers or what I see taking place locally or even globally," he outlined.

"I tend to address a lot of socio-political issues and there's always a spiritual aspect as well. I understand the many ills in our society. After all, many of them affect the youths."

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