Give unselfishly, receive abundantly!

Published: Wednesday | June 27, 2012 Comments 0

HELLO MI neighbour! If the economic hardship makes it difficult for you to feed yourself, maybe it's time to change your perspective on life - start feeding someone else who might be equally hungry.

What? Yes - out of your limited resources at that! Might sound impractical, but hear me out. There is a tried and proven divine law, which guarantees that what we share with others is multiplied back to us: "Give and it shall be given back to you - in abundance."

The story goes that as a rabbi spoke with God about selfishness and unselfishness one day, God said: "I will show you what selfishness is like." They went into a room, which had a large pot of delicious stew.

Around this pot sat a group of people who were dying of starvation. All were holding very long spoons, which could reach to the pot, but because of their length could not reach their mouths. "Now I will show you unselfishness," said God. They went into another room where there was another group of people around a pot of stew. Their spoons were even longer than those in the previous room. Yet, they were well-nourished. The rabbi was puzzled. "It is simple," said God. "Instead of each selfishly trying to feed himself/herself, they have learned to feed each other." Wow!

Someone says, "If we work on marble, it will perish. If we work on brass, time will efface it. If we erect great temples, they will crumble into dust. But if we work upon immortal minds and instil into them just principles, we are then engraving upon tablets, which no time will efface."

Put simply, we must always place a higher value on the well-being of others than on material possessions, which cannot replace that human touch, especially at a time when the soul is dry and thirsty.

John and Don, who lived under similar circumstances, lost fathers under similar circumstances. With younger siblings to be fed, John and Don became breadwinners at ages 10 and 11. Begging was their only means of enabling their daily bread. Unkind neighbours would oftentimes insult them, but the siblings' needs kept them going.

With time, they became hardened beggars. They knew nothing about giving. As cash flow dwindled, one day a priest asked Don if he had ever thought of giving instead of begging. The lad could not see through the question. The priest went on to explain the principle of giving and receiving and encouraged him to try it. With a heavy heart, he decided to comply and encouraged John to do likewise. John refused. Cutting to the chase, Don's life turned around. Before long, he was no longer a beggar. Today, Don owns his own business from which he has been helping unfortunate children whose fathers are absent. Four words sum up John's life: John continues to beg.

Thanks for helping

1. Neighbour, St Andrew, for giving a mattress to Evadney, St Catherine.

2. Mr Holmes, St Ann, for giving a brand-new stove to neighbour in MoBay.

3. Ms Ella, Florida, for giving Kelly-Ann, St Andrew, a brand-new sewing machine.

4. Ms Anderson, St Andrew, for giving a king-size mattress, book case and desk to neighbour.

Opportunities to help

Neighbour, two out of five children not attending school because of financial difficulties; needs help to obtain birth certificate.

Neighbour, St Elizabeth: mother of boy, 10, and girl, 13, husband blind, needs help with food.

Jonie, St Andrew: needs a stove - cannot afford to buy one.

Deon, St Andrew: needs a wheelchair for an elderly neighbour.

Vanessa, St Andrew: needs two mattresses (double and single).

Patricia, Manchester: needs a mattress.

To help us, please call 334-8165, 884-3866, 299-3412 or deposit to acct # 351 044 276 NCB. (Bank routing #: JNCBJMKX) or send donations to Hello Neighbour C/o 53 Half-Way Tree Road, Kingston 10. Email helloneighbour@yahoo.com.


Share |

The comments on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gleaner.
The Gleaner reserves the right not to publish comments that may be deemed libelous, derogatory or indecent. Please keep comments short and precise. A maximum of 8 sentences should be the target. Longer responses/comments should be sent to "Letters of the Editor" using the feedback form provided.
blog comments powered by Disqus