Who thief the gold out of de Jamaican flag?

Published: Thursday | August 9, 2012 Comments 0

THE EDITOR, Sir:

AS WE celebrate Jamaica's 50th anniversary and our search for gold at the London Olympics, now more than ever the image of the Jamaican flag has been used in several campaigns. But I am just wondering if the colours of the flag have changed?

As I look very closely, the colours being depicted in the Jamaican flag are black, green and yellow, but growing up I was educated that the colours on the flag were black, gold and green ... each representing different aspects of our struggle as a nation and as a people and the mission we are on.

As a person that operates an entity that represents advertising, public relations, events planning and decor, I truly believe that we need to standardise the look of the flag, just like when we are using a corporate/company logo. This greenish yellow that is being used on most of the flags being sold on the road is heart-rending.

My company decorated one of the many offices that wanted to show that they were celebrating Jamaica's 50th anniversary. The client asked me to use the yellow colour on the Jamaican flag instead of the gold colour I was using; I had to nicely educate her that the actual colours that are supposed to be on the flag are black, green and gold - not yellow.

I just honestly want to know if the yellow is an accepted substitute colour on the flag, or did we change the colour from gold to yellow while I was away? Even the Jamaican flag on our athletes' running gear looks yellow instead of gold.

If yellow is not the proper colour, why are we accepting it in so many local and international campaigns? Would the United States or Britain accept a purplish blue for their beloved blue on their flags?

We have a responsibility to educate the next generation.

I would like to ask the question. Who thief the gold out of de Jamaican flag?

Please set the record straight.

Tracey C Hamilton

eventsplanning_pr@yahoo.com

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