Kesha whips up gastronomic delights in Port Antonio

Published: Saturday | September 8, 2012 Comments 0
Kesha Thompson filling a lunch box with avocado, roasted breadfruit, fried plantain, and roasted fish during her recent fish fry.-Photo by Gareth Davis
Kesha Thompson filling a lunch box with avocado, roasted breadfruit, fried plantain, and roasted fish during her recent fish fry.-Photo by Gareth Davis

Gareth Davis, Gleaner Writer

PORT ANTONIO, Portland:AFTER ACQUIRING basic skills and knowledge in the culinary arts, which propelled her into baking pizza, Kesha Thompson has again trod into new territory with her cooking skills, which continue to satisfy the cravings of many.

Known in several communities in Portland for her homemade pizza, Kesha has decided to take up the new challenge of fish frying.

"The support is overwhelming. Portlanders have developed a craving for fish, and having realised that, I decided that a fish fry is the way to their stomachs," Thompson said.

"It took me several weeks to make the decision to prepare an additional meal, bearing in mind that the homemade pizza is doing excellent. I was surprised at the turn of events. People turned out in alarming proportions, and I basically ran out of stock," she recounted.

SUCCESSFUL FISH FRY

Kesha's fish fry, which is done quarterly, has had resounding success as news spread like wild fire about the proclaimed 'best fish fry' in town. It has attracted hundreds of patrons, including nurses, teachers, the police, politicians, and taxi operators.

The young entrepreneur boasts about her new offering of steamed fish, fried fish, fish tea, roasted fish, escoveitch fish, and curried fish.

Fish is purchased from local fisherfolk in Manchioneal, Prospect, Bryans Bay, Hope Bay, and Boundbrook for $350 per pound. The cooked meal, which includes roasted breadfruit, fried plantain, festival, fish, and vegetable, is then sold to consumers for $500.

Kesha said: "My first choice is pizza; however, the fish fry as a one-day event is heavily supported. With the harsh economic times, I have to be constantly coming up with new ways and ideas about how best to attract the spending public. The customers come first, and once I am able to please them, the business will remain afloat."

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