NY transit on the mend after Sandy

Published: Friday | November 2, 2012 Comments 0
Water flows past debris from a destroyed home yesterday in Mantoloking, New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy caused the ocean to cut a channel through to the bay, shown flowing here, which effectively cut the borough in two. Most of the multimillion-dollar homes along this old-money stretch of the Jersey shore were seriously damaged by pounding surf, wild wind and, in some cases, fire from ruptured gas lines. Numerous homes were destroyed, and some were obliterated, leaving behind just empty sand or maybe a few broken pilings jutting up out of the surf.
Water flows past debris from a destroyed home yesterday in Mantoloking, New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy caused the ocean to cut a channel through to the bay, shown flowing here, which effectively cut the borough in two. Most of the multimillion-dollar homes along this old-money stretch of the Jersey shore were seriously damaged by pounding surf, wild wind and, in some cases, fire from ruptured gas lines. Numerous homes were destroyed, and some were obliterated, leaving behind just empty sand or maybe a few broken pilings jutting up out of the surf.

NEW YORK (AP):

New York City moved closer to resuming its frenetic pace by getting back its vital subways yesterday, three days after a superstorm, but neighbouring New Jersey was stunned by coastal devastation and the news of thousands of people in one city still stranded by increasingly fetid flood waters.

The decision to reopen undamaged parts of the United States' largest transit system came as the death toll reached more than 80 in the US and left more than 4.6 million homes and businesses without power. Hurricane Sandy earlier left at least another 69 people dead as it swept through the Caribbean.

The total damage from superstorm Sandy could run as high as $50 billion, according to the forecasting firm Eqecat. That would make it the second-costliest storm in US history after Hurricane Katrina. The estimate includes property damage and lost business

In New York, people streamed into the city as service began to resume on commuter train and subway. The three major airports resumed at least limited service, and the New York Stock Exchange was open again. Amtrak's Northeast Corridor, the busiest train line in the country, was to take commuters along the heavily populated East Coast again starting today.

But hundreds of people lined up for buses, traffic jammed for miles (kilometres) and long gas lined formed. And the latest deaths reported included two young boys who disappeared Monday night when waves of water crashed into an SUV.



Full Caption: Water flows past debris from a destroyed home yesterday in Mantoloking, New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy caused the ocean to cut a channel through to the bay, shown flowing here, which effectively cut the borough in two. Most of the multimillion-dollar homes along this old-money stretch of the Jersey shore were seriously damaged by pounding surf, wild wind and, in some cases, fire from ruptured gas lines. Numerous homes were destroyed, and some were obliterated, leaving behind just empty sand or maybe a few broken pilings jutting up out of the surf.

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