Henry Lowe did it

Published: Sunday | December 9, 2012 Comments 0
Professor Lowe (left), Janet Lowe (centre) and Ronald Thwaites share a pleasant moment.-  Winston Sill/Freelance Photographer
Professor Lowe (left), Janet Lowe (centre) and Ronald Thwaites share a pleasant moment.- Winston Sill/Freelance Photographer
Tanikie McClarthy (left), deputy CEO, Environmental Health Foundation; Professor Lowe (second left), chairman, Environmental Health Foundation; Janet Lowe (second right); and Novlet Deans, CEO, Environmental Health Foundation, acknowledge our lens.
Tanikie McClarthy (left), deputy CEO, Environmental Health Foundation; Professor Lowe (second left), chairman, Environmental Health Foundation; Janet Lowe (second right); and Novlet Deans, CEO, Environmental Health Foundation, acknowledge our lens.

Chester Francis-Jackson, Contributor

Since the lingering and frustrating demise of sugar cane, and the changing fortunes that have seen bauxite losing its place, Jamaica and Jamaicans for the most part have been trapped in the old way of thinking and doing business, with precious few new ideas brought to the table to energise industry and create employment. People are still driving forward with their eyes firmly fixed in the rear-view mirror and, as they would have us believe, they are the ones with the answer for the present and the future.

It is at this juncture that this scribe would advise those so trapped to send a note to self, advising self to wake up to the new realities.

And what are the new realities.

Well, Professor Henry Lowe has been leading the way in this respect, as he has been pioneering the research and use of traditional medicine, herbs and 'bushes', as one of the new way forward, that can stimulate growth, while serving as a pillar to resuscitate the Jamaican economy.

As the new e-society has been evolving, it has been realising that this new society has some old and new maladies that modern medicine has had limited success in treating with. Correspondingly, the e-society has been discovering that the pre-Internet, Facebook and Twitter society suffered these same maladies, but managed them more effectively with traditional herbs, medicine, spices and bushes. And today, the e-society is now wholly embracing the cures and medicine of their forebears.

voice in the wilderness

It is in this area that Professor Lowe has been like a voice in the wilderness, as indeed on the face of it, bush medicine is not quite as fashionable and appealing for the e-age, so many have eschewed the science of bush medicine, opting instead to glory in meaningless placebos and other forms of quackery prescribed by station and/or ability to pay.

To his credit, however, Lowe has persevered, and today, maybe Jamaica is not sitting up and taking notice of the renewed interest in traditional medicine and its ability to keep us a relatively healthy society, but the world is, as across the globe, people are now going back to their roots in search of cures with soursop and Guinea-hen weed, Neme and a whole heap of old-time remedies, now becoming part and parcel of the contemporary health lexicon and, by extension, the new wealth creator.

Well, Lowe has followed his dream, and today his wellness centre and pioneering history has stood him in good stead, with him being awarded an Order of Jamaica for his outstanding work over the years. He has, however, true to his own discipline, taken his journey one step further as he has documented his journey to date in an autobiographical tome titled It Can Be Done, in which he chronicles and shares his journey from childhood to his wellness empire.

And so it was, to launch his autobiographical tome, It Can Be Done, relatives, friends, well-wishers, and colleagues joined Lowe and his fabulous wife, Janet Lowe, at his Eden Gardens Wellness and Lifestyle Centre, over there on Lady Musgrave Road (currently under redevelopment), last Wednesday for the official launch of the book.

Well, it was done and in fine and poetic style as indeed there were readings from the book, presentations and testimonials from colleagues and literary endorsements, in what was truly a charming evening, punctuated by flowing libations and fabulous-tasting nibblies to make for a simply wonderful outing, with among those out included Education Minister MP Ronald Thwaites; former Governor General Sir Kenneth Hall, Custos of Kingston Steadman Fuller and wife Sonia; the author's sibling Dr Herbert Lowe and wife Venus, in from Florida; the renowned Professor Ivor Crandon; the esteemed Professor Winston Davidson and wife Dr Sonia Davidson; Dr Alverston Bailey; the charming Lorraine Johnson; Dr Perceval Bahado Singh; Professor Trevor Yee; Yvonne Aquart; Philbert Perry; Ian Laidlaw; Colin Leslie, LMH Publishing; Richard Kelly, PIOJ; Kellie Magnus; Neville Blythe and son Christopher Blythe; the fab Dr Kurdell Espinosa; Leighton McKnight; the esteemed Minna Israel; the renowned Fae Ellington (who was the mistress of ceremonies); the celebrated Keith Amiel; businessman Y.P. Seaton; Kent Gammon; Pan Caribbean Jermaine Deans and his fabulous wife, the stunning Novlet Green-Deans, she being the Group CEO, EHF Group; the fabulous Donna Grant; Delano Seiveright; the lovely Tess-Maria Leon; Brian Denning; Lance Hylton; Glynnis Salmon; and Tony Lowrie, who performed excerpts, adding to what was truly a very charming outing.



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