Not by might nor by power

Published: Monday | April 22, 2013 Comments 0
The PNP's Peter Bunting. - FILE
The PNP's Peter Bunting. - FILE
Lyston
Lyston

Steve Lyston, Contributor

The monster of crime which is ravishing the nation is cause for each of us to look into ourselves individually and collectively to see whether our actions are in anyway contributing to the escalation of crime.

The utterance by Minister of National Security Peter Bunting about crime - it was not flesh and blood that revealed it (Matthew 16: 17) but the Spirit (of God). Anyone who does not agree with Him needs to revisit the basis of their faith and their motives.

Fighting crime and the building of a nation cannot be done by military might or political power but by spiritual energy. Zechariah 4: 6 reminds us, "...'Not by might, nor by power, but by My Spirit' says the Lord of hosts." That is why we need the Nehemiah-type leadership, who will identify himself with the problem to the extent that he confesses his sin along with his people. Nehemiah did not point fingers (Nehemiah 1: 6-11).

For years, both parties have ignored the call for coming together seeking divine intervention. They only seek to use the church for political mileage.

With the high levels of crime that the nation has been experiencing, without a doubt, the walls and gates have broken down. It means that it has been left to the mercy of the elements that cause total degradation. Clearly, there is a lack of fear of God and a great deal of fear among the people! (Nehemiah 3.)

We must repair the walls and fix the gates - which includes the legal system and wherever decisions are made.

Contributory factors

There many contributory factors influencing the escalation of the crime rate including:

Injustice

Poverty & unemployment

Greed for power

Sin & breaking spiritual laws

Witchcraft

Unforgiveness

Perversion

Immorality

Politics

Negative utterances

It was disappointing to see that the Opposition did not come forward to support the statement, because it would have been a golden opportunity for the opposition spokesman to do so for the sake of the nation; keeping in mind that crime does not discriminate!

Regardless of how brilliant a security minister is, how vocal human-rights personnel are, how many police personnel has been mobilised, how intellectual an individual is, it is poised to fail without divine intervention! (Psalm 127: 1.)

When dealing with the 'seven deadly sins' (Matthew 15: 19), only divine intervention can address those spiritual warfare.

With the number of fatalities and other crimes, undoubtedly, the nation is at war. In war, one cannot win a battle unless you know what you are fighting.

Who are we fighting; a human being or a strongman?

Where are the 'broken walls' located?

What are the waste places?

What area needs to be repaired?

Furthermore, we have to identify the enemy's command and control; and with divine help, take out those command-and-control centres. Then we will have peace.

REFLECTION OF THE CHURCHES

The state of the nation is a reflection of our churches. The Church is called, as is outlined in the book of Ephesians - to engage in spiritual warfare. What we see in the natural is a reflection of what is occurring in the invisible/spiritual realm. Hence, we need alternative methods to deal with the crime situation.

The church leaders must now move away from ineffective, ritualistic behaviour and religiosity. Even doing a march for the sake of showing support will not deal with the matter! But getting a divine revelation of what is really needed and will, in fact, being effective is what church leaders must now look toward.

All the political parties must come together in a day of atonement/repentance and cry out for God's divine intervention (Joel 1 & 2), to bring healing and change to the nation, the economy and to rescue our youth. If we fail to do so, then we will indeed have an intervention, but it will not be the kind we want.

Steve Lyston is a biblical economics consultant and author of several books, including 'End Time Finance' and 'The New Millionaire'.



 

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