IDB approves use of Jamaica's public procurement system

Published: Monday | November 11, 2013 Comments 0
Horace Dalley
Horace Dalley

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has approved Jamaica, the only CARICOM country, and seven Latin American countries to use procurement sub-systems on bank-financed projects.

This approval comes after the assessment of procurement systems and their compliance with international best practice, which reflected the countries' efforts to improve their public procurement systems.

Horace Dalley, minister without portfolio in the Ministry of Finance, said Jamaica welcomed this announcement and is pleased that efforts are being made by the Government to reform its procurement system, which has received approval from the IDB.

In keeping with its continued commitment to improving and modernising public procurement, the Government of Jamaica through the Ministry of Finance and Planning's Procurement and Asset Policy Unit (PAPU) has undertaken several activities aimed at improving the transparency and efficiency of the procurement system, the legislative and regulatory framework as well as procurement operations and market practices.

To this end, PAPU has developed strategies to modernise the procurement process. Primary among them is the promulgation of the first stand-alone Public Procurement Law, which in now being drafted; the revision of the Government of Jamaica Handbook of Public Sector Procurement Procedures, which outlines the Government's procurement policies and procedures; the launch of a Public Procurement Page that contains all the Government of Jamaica's procurement opportunities; and the introduction of an Electronic Government Procurement System, which will see the automation of the procurement system.

The Procurement and Asset Policy Unit is the national contact point for information and clarification on public sector procurement policy, legislation, regulation and procedure.

It is also the designated feedback and reporting mechanism for the public sector procurement system.

 

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