Fri | Dec 9, 2016

Who vetoed Whitmore's plan?

Published:Tuesday | February 3, 2015 | 12:00 AM

Bleachers Report (BR) did not watch much of the Under-20 World Cup qualifiers played in Jamaica.

With 12 teams divided in two groups, it enabled each to play a minimum of five matches, all in the name of player development, said Jeffrey Webb, the not-so-new CONCACAF boss from the little island of Cayman.

BR likes him so far. He has done very well, more than the previous boss, Austin 'Jack' Warner, in establishing some transparency in the eyes of the football nations over which he presides.

Webb needs to do the Caribbean countries another favour - that of payment of training compensation to local clubs from clubs in the United States' MLS competition.

Meanwhile, in the Bleachers and everywhere else, including squabbling among babies, there are cries about how the team looked with too many schoolboys, not enough Premier League players, boys cannot pass, technically poor players, players not coached properly, and that the coaching staff and technical committee must be fired.

Some are calling for the resignation of the JFF president and the whole supporting cast. The coaching staff comprises Theodore Whitmore (head coach), Lenworth Hyde Sr (assistant coach), Vin Blaine (director of football), and André Waugh (physical trainer).

Absence Of Players

The Bleachers laments the absence of players from the last Under-17 (2013) national team, including Cavalier's Ryan Miller, Arnett Gardens' Raffique Bryan, Clarendon College's Segal Knight, Santos' Oniel Anderson, and Waterhouse's André Leslie, all playing senior team football.

Jamaica, the host nation, finished with two points after losing three matches. In fairness, they were not blown out in any of the matches, but they could not win against the group's 'beating stick', Aruba, in the final match of the tournament.

If you think the team and coach are the only ones at fault, then BR has evidence that much of the blame must fall elsewhere.

For a football organisation to succeed, it must have the four basic pillars: good management, good players, good facilities, and adequate finance.

Most teams trained for this tournament for over two years, played up to 30 international practice matches, and sent their Under-20 team to the Pan American tournament.

Instead, Jamaica sent their Under-23 team to the PanAm tournament, with four older players, and besides a guest appearance in the Central American (UNCAF) Under-20 Championships, played only two international matches - against Cuba - days before the tournament.

Whitmore's Plan

The Jamaican team had only six weeks of concentrated training as the JFF facility was used to facilitate the women's and Under-17 teams in that crucial period.

BR has proof that the coach asked the JFF to support the programme properly for six months. Not enough time in BR's view, but a fairly decent plan.

It included having camps - locally and abroad - and a request for international practice games. However, he was turned down flat.

Below is the Under-20 World Cup qualifying plan submitted by Whitmore:

BR believes given the preparation, we are lucky Jamaica did not get some six-love beatings.

Now, BR is asking, 'Who got the plan? Why was it not acted upon?

Preparation Cost

Also, if Jamaica spent $200 million to host the tournament, how much did it spend to prepare the team? Was it $200,000?

Whitmore has a right not to resign. As a matter of fact, a host of persons should resign before him.

Captain, you a 'di' boss. Ask Raymond Grant, Mrs Janice Rose Brown, Vin Blaine, Howard Bell, Howard McIntosh, or Whitmore who in the JFF says Whitmore 'fi' get fired and why should he?

Public, wey you say?

The JFF personnel who got the request, why wasn't any assistance given and didn't anyone tell Captain about the plan requested by Whitmore? Why was it not acted upon? BR believes the public has a right to know who vetoed the plan and ridiculed Jamaica's football.

Whitmore, in the meantime, must be humming: "Them gi mi basket fi carry water."