Fri | Dec 9, 2016

Swift River artist to exhibit in Switzerland

Published:Sunday | November 30, 2014 | 12:00 AM

The work of Jamaican artist Kingsley Thomas will feature in a major exhibition which opens in Switzerland today. His work will be among notable international artists such as Dutch painter Marcelle Hanselaar and Swiss rising star El Frauenfelder.

"Kingsley Thomas' work stands up strongly against the other exhibitors," said Daniel Kellenberger, who opened the gallery 15 years ago. "It has soul. He tackles political and social issues while keeping his approach personal and deep."

The show, called 'Through the Window', is at Kunsthaeuschen-Herrliberg gallery, which overlooks the Lake of Zurich. More than 100 works of art by 30 artists are arranged over four floors. Kingsley Thomas is represented by six paintings and one sculpture.

In the winter of 2012-13, the gallery held an exhibition of Jamaican Intuitive Art. "Swiss people are intrigued by the Jamaican work because of its energy and honesty," said Kellenberger.

DREAMING OF JAMAICA

Although they have spoken on the phone, Daniel Kellenberger has never met Kingsley Thomas, who lives in Swift River, Portland. "My dream is to visit Jamaica, but unfortunately, I have a phobia of flying and I don't know when I will be brave enough to get on a plane."

Instead, the gallery's curator, Charlotte C. Mortensson, has been travelling regularly to Jamaica on his behalf, where she has received help and advice from many people, including art collector and framer Herman van Asbroeck of Amaicraft Ltd and Dr David Boxer, previously director and chief curator of the National Gallery of Jamaica. "My brilliant driver, Oral Coleman, who I've been working with for six years, and his family have also been a tremendous support," she adds.

Daniel Kellenberger's commitment to Jamaican Intuitive artists will continue. A solo exhibition of Christopher Harris' work is planned for spring 2015 and a retrospective of Kingsley Thomas' work for 2016. Both these artists have been exhibited in the National Gallery of Jamaica, Kingston.