Tue | Jun 15, 2021

Father’s Day: A radical sermon introduction

Published:Tuesday | June 8, 2021 | 12:06 AM

THE EDITOR, Madam:

The 20th century was, arguably, the first century in human history that a call for men to arise was necessary and rang with urgency, because the 20th century was the first century in human history that men had not been clearly seen as leaders in homes, religious centres and the wider societies!

Concepts such as the ‘marginalisation of men’ and the ‘feminisation of the male temperament’ could not have been coined and would not have been taken seriously in any other century prior to the 20th century (or prior to the late 19th century)!

• Not before the 20th century could a movement such as militant feminism arise and be taken seriously!

• Not before the 20th century could there be serious talk about women in security forces fighting on equal terms with men!

• Not before the 20th century could a male teacher in day school or religious school be regularly called ‘miss’ by innocent children!

• Not before the 20th century could a book be written with the dubious title, ‘My Mother who Fathered Me’! Okay, it’s a sociological metaphor I know but still, from a clinical child rearing standpoint, like seriously?

• Not before the 20th century could you find Churches that are more populated and dominated by women than by men!

The call for men to arise in the home, in the Church and in the wider society is not only necessary but urgent now, because the 20th century has seen the reversal of 19 centuries of male leadership (not always positive, mind you) and because the 21st century is likely to be worse than the 20th century.

So then history declares that men should arise, the present demands that men should arise and the future, if it is to be better, dictates that men should arise as good leaders in the home, in the Church and in the wider society.

REV CLINTON CHISHOLM