Tue | Sep 28, 2021

Universities are losing focus on education

Published:Friday | July 23, 2021 | 12:06 AM

THE EDITOR, Madam:

Universities are becoming more businesslike and their objective is on better marketing, earning more profits and creating an exquisite environment that will attract more students to enrol. It’s unfortunate for university students these days because the system is just a façade, where only the richest and the fittest will survive.

Also, where are the lecturers who understand that not all students grasp concepts at the same pace? Jamaican education system does not need this type of energy from lecturers. Students work hard and relentlessly day and night to make it to school, perform well, and accomplish their goals. The question to ponder is why our universities are charging so much money for poor-quality service.

A hard-working and articulate student doesn’t deserve to be greeted in a class by a lecturer who taunt them. “Universities aren’t supposed to spoon-feed you” or “oh, you are supposed to know this” are the popular statements thrown at students whenever they seek help. Is the goal not to guide or support?

Meanwhile, YouTube lessons are getting popular as many students find them more favourable for learning. Social media platforms are free, engaging, creative, and is the end cost of improving grades and success in college.

Most university students success is not fully credited to the university or lecturers, but self-studying and to Internet. It even gets worse when they don’t turn up to classes, rush through the course outlines, and read monotonously off PowerPoint presentations. This is why so many students zone out and stop showing up and they are tired of being treated as if they have no voice.

Universities should be about learning and motivating students. Jamaica needs professionals and successful graduates, well-trained scholars to represent our country well and to generate new ideas. Where do these individuals come from? Our universities and colleges offer such services to mould students into the professionals Jamaica needs.

JULLIAN BLAIR