Sun | Dec 5, 2021

JSIF signs $43.9m MOU

Published:Friday | March 1, 2019 | 12:33 AM
Seated (from left): Orville Hill, general manager, finance and procurement at JSIF; Omar Sweeney, managing director at JSIF; and Rohan Richards, technical director at JSIF, participate in the signing of an MOU between JSIF and the Ministry of National Security on Oxford Road, New Kingston, on Thursday. Looking on are Orette Boscoe, statistics manager, JSIF, and Shauna Trowers, acting chief technical director at the Ministry of National Security.
Seated (from left): Orville Hill, general manager, finance and procurement at JSIF; Omar Sweeney, managing director at JSIF; and Rohan Richards, technical director at JSIF, participate in the signing of an MOU between JSIF and the Ministry of National Security on Oxford Road, New Kingston, on Thursday. Looking on are Orette Boscoe, statistics manager, JSIF, and Shauna Trowers, acting chief technical director at the Ministry of National Security.

The Ministry of National Security (MNS) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF) for a further $43.9 million in financial support for the Jamaica Crime Observatory Enhancement Project.

The Crime Observatory is an instrument through which the MNS keeps up-to-date, reliable data so as to promote transparency, security, and safety in the national interest. It also establishes valid and consistent crime and violence-related statistics.

The project, which commenced in May 2014, will continue until May 2020.

According to Shauna Trowers, acting chief technical director of research in the Ministry of National Security, the project has been successful thus far.

“Our achievement to date has been mainly equipping the ... Jamaica Constabulary Force with the information technology equipment in the form of desktop computers, laptops, and other related equipment that’s needed to ensure that the crime observatory functions as it should.

“In terms of capacity building, we are looking at spatial analysis … so we need to understand the terrain so we know what kind of policing is necessary. We also are looking at the GIS (geographic information system), using the technology to leverage our policing, and that is what the observatory and the information have done to date,” Trowers said.

When the programme started in 2011, it covered five parishes and five types of incidents. It has since expanded to cover all 14 parishes and collects data on murders, shootings, sexual offences, robberies, fatal shootings, traffic fatalities, and suicides.

nickoy.wilson@gleanerjm.com