Sat | Sep 18, 2021

IMO adopts additional measures to reduce emissions

Published:Tuesday | July 6, 2021 | 12:06 AM
The new International Maritime Organization measures are aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions by commercial vessels.
The new International Maritime Organization measures are aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions by commercial vessels.

New measures to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by commercial vessels were adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) recently.

The measures were approved at the international agency’s Maritime Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 76) meeting held virtually from June 10 to 17.

The actions are amendments to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) Annex VI and will require vessels to improve energy efficiency using technical and operational approaches that reduce GHG emissions.

Additionally, the changes will require all ships to calculate their energy efficiency and establish an annual operational carbon intensity indication (CII), which links GHG emissions to the amount of cargo being transported over distance travelled, and CII rating.

Vessels will be rated from A to E, where A is regarded as the best. The IMO said it is encouraging administrations, port authorities and other stakeholders to provide incentives for ships that are rated A or B. It was further stated that ships rated D or E for three consecutive years, will be required to provide a plan to show how the rating of required C or greater will be achieved.

IMO Secretary General Kitack Lim said the move will push the industry towards decarbonisation.

“The path to decarbonisation is a long, but also a common path in which we need to consider and respect each other’s views. We have made a considerable amount of progress since the start of our journey,” Lim said.

The measures adopted support existing regulations, which aim to reduce carbon intensity of international shipping by 40 per cent in comparison to 2008 levels.

MARPOL Annex VI has 100 contracting states who represent almost 97 per cent of global merchant shipping by tonnage.