Tue | Apr 13, 2021

Something Extra | Thursday

Published:Thursday | March 11, 2021 | 12:08 AM
Ayesha Creary, president, Creative Marketing Associates.
Ayesha Creary, president, Creative Marketing Associates.
Nayana Williams, CEO and founder, Lifespan Spring Water Company.
Nayana Williams, CEO and founder, Lifespan Spring Water Company.
Angelie Spencer, principal and interior decorator, Angelie Spencer Home.
Angelie Spencer, principal and interior decorator, Angelie Spencer Home.
Nayana Williams, CEO and founder, Lifespan Spring Water Company.
Nayana Williams, CEO and founder, Lifespan Spring Water Company.
Stacey Halsall-Peart, chief operating officer, Advanced Integrated Systems.
Stacey Halsall-Peart, chief operating officer, Advanced Integrated Systems.
Michelle Gordon, parenting consultant and magazine editor.
Michelle Gordon, parenting consultant and magazine editor.
Michelle Gordon, parenting consultant and magazine editor
Michelle Gordon, parenting consultant and magazine editor
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Our children are the future, and the lessons we instil in them will impact the world for generations. Something Extra asked five women to share the most important lessons they’ve taught their daughter or son. These are their responses.

Nayana Williams, CEO and founder, Lifespan Spring Water Company:

“I try to emphasise to my son the importance of gratitude. Being thankful for waking up in the mornings and breathing the fresh air. For being able to view nature in its splendour, for the food we are able to enjoy and the roof over our head; and for everything else we have been blessed with.”

Stacey Halsall-Peart, chief operating officer, Advanced Integrated Systems:

“I try to teach my children that happiness comes from the simplest of things, and at times, in the most unexpected places. As parents, we expect so much of our children. We try to give them everything in an attempt to make them greater than life. The focus is often on success, and not happiness — they’re not the same and should both be considered. In choosing universities, my daughter listed all the Ivy Leagues as possible institutions of higher learning. I think she was surprised when I told her that we didn’t need her to go to a prestigious institution. We wanted her to go to a university that included her dreams, but also made her happy, and I didn’t think that an Ivy League could do that — you can just imagine the look of confusion.”

Angelie Spencer, principal and interior decorator, Angelie Spencer Home:

“Definitely self-worth, self-love and self-respect. My daughter must value her worth first if she is going to expect that of anyone else. I have taught her that she has to live in a state of complete self-assurance, because she can’t [base] her validity on the opinions of others. Once she does that first, then she can demand that of others. Conversely, I share the same lessons with my son so that he understands how valuable women are, and that he loves and respects women.”

Michelle Gordon, parenting consultant and magazine editor:

“There have been so many lessons along the way, but the most significant is probably teaching them that their relationship with God is central to their success. I’ve taught them how to pray and where to go to re-centre themselves when life gets tough. They’re still young, so ‘tough’ now probably means challenging friendships, teen issues, hard work at school and wanting to be independent. Hopefully, when life’s trials come at them later on, they’ll remain focused, knowing that the relationship with God, and not religion, will keep them on track.”

Ayesha Creary, president, Creative Marketing Associates:

“There are so many lessons. In fact, each day, my own behaviour impacts the people they will become. I think the most important thing for me is to ensure that they are well grounded in faith, in confidence and in self-worth, and to know that they must always act with integrity and be

grateful for small mercies.”