Sun | Jan 23, 2022

Biden team regroups after court loss on COVID shots-or-test

Published:Friday | January 14, 2022 | 5:44 PM
President Joe Biden speaks about the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law at the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House Campus in Washington, Friday, January 14, 2022, as Mitch Landrieu, Senior Advisor & Infrastructure Act Implementation Coordinator, looks on. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Concerned but not giving up, President Joe Biden is anxiously pushing ahead to prod people to get COVID-19 shots after the Supreme Court put a halt to the administration's sweeping vaccinate-or-test plan for large employers.

At a time when hospitals are being overrun and record numbers of people are getting infected with the omicron variant, the administration hopes states and companies will order their own vaccinate-or-test requirements.

And if the presidential “bully pulpit” still counts for persuasion, Biden intends to use it.

While some in the business community cheered the defeat of the mandate, Biden insisted the administration effort has not been for naught.

The high court's ruling on Thursday “does not stop me from using my voice as president to advocate for employers to do the right thing to protect Americans' health and economy,” he said.

The court's conservative majority all but struck down the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's requirement that employers with 100 or more employees require their workers to be vaccinated against the coronavirus or tested weekly.

However, it did leave in place a vaccination requirement for health care workers.

Meanwhile, the White House announced Friday that the federal website where Americans can request their own free COVID-19 tests will begin accepting orders next Wednesday.

Those tests could provide motivation for some people to seek vaccination, and the administration is looking to address nationwide shortages. Supplies will be limited to just four free tests per home.

On Thursday, the Supreme Court ruled that OSHA appeared to overstep its congressional authority to implement occupational standards, saying, “Although COVID–19 is a risk that occurs in many workplaces, it is not an occupational hazard in most.”

The mandate was announced last September, accompanied by biting criticism from Biden for the roughly 80 million American adults who hadn't yet gotten shots.

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