Fri | Aug 12, 2022

With no fuel and no cash, Sri Lanka keeps schools closed

Published:Sunday | July 3, 2022 | 10:24 AM
People wait to buy fuel at a fuel station in Colombo, Sri Lanka on June 27, 2022. Cash-strapped Sri Lanka on Sunday announced closing schools for one week and appealed to the country’s expatriates to send money home through the banks to pay for new oil purchases amid a worsening shortage of fuel. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena, File)

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Cash-strapped Sri Lanka on Sunday extended school closures for one week because there isn't enough fuel for teachers and parents to get children to classrooms, and the energy minister appealed to the country's expatriates to send money home through banks to finance new oil purchases.

A huge foreign debt has left the Indian Ocean island with none of the suppliers willing to sell fuel on credit.

The available stocks, sufficient for only several days, will be provided for essential services, including health and port workers, public transport and food distribution, officials said.

”Finding money is a challenge. It's a huge challenge,” Power and Energy Minister Kanchana Wijesekera told reporters.

He said the government has ordered new fuel stocks and the first ship with 40,000 metric tons of diesel is expected to arrive on Friday while the first ship carrying gasoline would come on July 22.

Several other fuel shipments are in the pipeline. But he said authorities are struggling to find $587 million to pay for the fuel.

Wijesekera said that Sri Lanka owed about $800 million to seven fuel suppliers.

Last month, schools were closed nationwide for a day due to fuel shortages and had remained closed for the last two weeks in urban areas.

Schools will remain shut until Friday.

Authorities also announced countrywide power cuts of up to three hours a day from Monday because they can't supply enough fuel to power generating stations.

Sweeping power cuts have been a blight on Sri Lanka's economy for months, along with severe shortages of essentials including cooking gas, medicine and food imports.

Follow The Gleaner on Twitter and Instagram @JamaicaGleaner and on Facebook @GleanerJamaica. Send us a message on WhatsApp at 1-876-499-0169 or email us at onlinefeedback@gleanerjm.com or editors@gleanerjm.com.