Tue | Jun 22, 2021

This day in 1962

Published:Wednesday | March 28, 2012 | 12:00 AM

JAMAICA's historical landscape is littered with dates which have shaped the terrain as well as the future of the country's diverse inhabitants.

These events range from catastrophic to euphoric with no shortage of recollection whenever the various milestones are mentioned.

From earthquakes, hurricanes and fires to Olympic glory and Independence, The Gleaner started chronicling Jamaica's roller-coaster history ride in 1834, and has had a front-row seat at every major event since.

With 2012 marking Jamaica's 50th year of Independence from Great Britain, The Gleaner continues to share events which made the news, this day, in 1962.

This day in 1962

JAMAICA's historical landscape is littered with dates which have shaped the terrain as well as the future of the country's diverse inhabitants.

These events range from catastrophic to euphoric with no shortage of recollection whenever the various milestones are mentioned.

From earthquakes, hurricanes and fires to Olympic glory and Independence, The Gleaner started chronicling Jamaica's roller-coaster history ride in 1834, and has had a front-row seat at every major event since.

With 2012 marking Jamaica's 50th year of Independence from Great Britain, The Gleaner continues to share events which made the news, this day, in 1962.

Government to control JPSCo rates

The House of Representatives, including the Opposition, has unanimously given Minister of Trade and Industry Wills Isaacs the power to fix all rates for electricity throughout the whole island, thus putting him in a position to freeze all current rates in those areas in which the Jamaica Public Service Co (JPSCo) Ltd retained the right under its licences to increase rates.

This action came on the heels of the company's announcement yesterday that, despite the minister's rate freeze under 13 of the company's licences, it intended to increase rates by nearly 10 per cent from April 1 in the remaining areas in which it was free to do so.

The Bill, which was rushed through all its stages in the House last night on the suspension of the Standing Orders, will go to the Legislative Council tomorrow where it is assured of quick passage by the Government's majority support in the council.

Care urged in use of water

An appeal to the public to exercise great care in the use of water was made at yesterday's Water Commission board meeting.

The chief engineer, W. Kirkpatrick, reported that because of the heavy draw-off and the drought, the storage at the Hermitage Dam was being depleted.

The present position is that the dam, which has a capacity of 430 million gallons, is only three-quarters filled. This supply is expected to last for another eight weeks.

Government protests UK preference for Cameroons bananas

Jamaica's Government has protested strongly to the United Kingdom (UK) government against an arrangement by which bananas from the former British Cameroons will continue to enter the UK market under preferential treatment.

The Cameroons recently achieved independence, the south joining with the former French Cameroons (now the Republic of Cameroon).

The British arrangement with the Cameroons is that this territory should continue to enjoy the Imperial Preference of £7.10 a ton on bananas shipped to the UK up to the end of September.

But Jamaica has taken the view that since the Cameroons are no longer a part of the Commonwealth, the preference should not apply.

End of the British garrison nears (excerpts from Page One Editorial)

When the Hampshires leave Jamaica in June, this island will cease to have a British garrison. For the greater part of its history, it has enjoyed the protection of British regiments -including the West India Regiment -and these have had a profound influence on the history of the country.

At night, looking from Kingston towards the St Andrew hills, one can see there a chain of lights marking the position of Newcastle, the most conspicuous legacy of the garrison.

The cantonment represents a power of judgment and a grasp of engineering possibilities worthy of a staff officer of Wellington. For it was Field Marshal Sir William Gomm (as he afterwards became) who created Newcastle 130 years ago.

Now Jamaica must depend on her own resources. The ultimate guarantee of internal order must be her own troops, and she must be able to offer resistance to an invader out of her own resources. Our own Jamaican troops may have to take part in United Nations operations in Africa or Iran. Our forces must create their own traditions and illustrious names that are wholly ours.

Stadium loan approved during emergency sitting of House

The House of Representatives last night approved a further interest-free loan of £560,000 to complete the construction of the National Stadium in time for the Independence celebrations on August 6.

This loan to National Sports Limited is to be repaid over a period of years, but the Government pointed out that the full support of all sections of the community would have to be given to achieve this aim.

In the course of a full day-and-night sitting that ended at 15 minutes after midnight, the House, summoned back for an emergency sitting after its dissolution on March 14, approved a Carrying-on Budget of £15,769,144 for the first four months at the new financial year, April 1, 1962 to July 31, 1962.

The vote for approval went along party lines, 16 to 3.