Fri | Aug 18, 2017

Knight labels some members of the private sector 'corrupt beasts'

Published:Friday | July 7, 2017 | 7:00 AM
K.D. Knight
Dennis Chung
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Opposition Senator K.D. Knight has castigated some members of the private sector for joining forces with some public officials to carry out acts of corruption in the public sector.

At the same time, Dennis Chung, chief executive officer of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica, says that anyone who knows of a person involved in corruption has an obligation to report it to the authorities.

Debating the Integrity Commission Act to set up a single anti-corruption commission to fight corrupt activities in the public sector, Knight told his colleagues in the Upper House yesterday that corruption was not confined to public officials but that the scourge was "deep in the private sector".

"Some of them that you hear making a whole lot of noise about corruption in the public sector are some of the most corrupt beasts roaming this country," he charged during his contribution to the debate.

 

WAY OF DOING BUSINESS

 

Knight noted that some private sector persons saw corruption "as a way of doing business. They don't really regard it as something wrong. They feel wronged to be brought to

justice".

Knight said that the Integrity Commission Act is intended to clamp down on corruption, which has become pervasive in the society.

Commenting on Knight's remarks, Chung agreed that it took two parties - the public official and the private individual - to be engaged in acts of corruption.

"If anyone is involved in corruption and you know about it, then you need to report it. You have an obligation under the law to report it," Chung said.

He argued that the keepers of the gate are the public officials, and the onus is on them to ensure that the private individual does not get away with corruption.

He insisted that the public official is entrusted with the responsibility of ensuring that the law is not breached. "If that person is approached by a private individual, then that person should do the right thing and report it to the police," the CEO said.