Wed | Aug 23, 2017

Infectious outbreak at KPH, no deaths

Published:Thursday | November 5, 2015 | 11:16 PM
The South East Regional Health Authority (SERHA) says it is closely monitoring three cases of the multi-drug resistant bacteria, Acinetobacter, at the Kingston Public Hospital (KPH).

Yet another Jamaican hospital is battling an infectious outbreak.

Outbreaks at the Cornwall Regional Hospital in St James and the University Hospital of the West Indies in St Andrew have resulted in the deaths of 19 premature babies over a four-month period.

The South East Regional Health Authority (SERHA) says it is closely monitoring three cases of the multi-drug resistant bacteria, Acinetobacter, at the Kingston Public Hospital (KPH).

There have been no deaths associated with this outbreak at the hospital.

Senior health officials at the hospital have advised that two of the three infected patients are already showing signs of recovery. 

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), all species of Acinetobacter can cause disease in humans.

Outbreaks of Acinetobacter infections typically occur in intensive care units and healthcare settings housing very ill patients.

SERHA says it received a report from KPH on Monday November 2 indicating the detection of the bacteria. 

Since receiving the report, the authority says it has been collaborating with the Kingston and St Andrew Public Health Department, the National Public Health Lab and the Ministry of Health to conduct an epidemiological investigation, in order to implement the most appropriate strategic plan to contain the spread of this infection.

The infection control team at KPH in conjunction with teams from the Public Health Department, the National Public Health Lab and Ministry of Health also started the reorientation of staff at KPH on infection control procedures and heightened surveillance on November 3.

SERHA Board Chairman, Dr Andrei Cooke says standard operating procedures are being followed with respect to the treatment of these infected patients, to include barrier nursing.

He also noted that the National Health Fund (NHF) has been contacted, and it has been providing support with the provision of the pharmaceuticals required for the effective treatment of the infected patients.