Wed | Jul 17, 2019

Growth & Jobs | ‘Nuh Inna Di Scandal': Young entrepreneurs create stylish totes to replace plastic bags

Published:Tuesday | January 1, 2019 | 12:00 AM
Members of the fledgling business entity, Those Creative People Tings (from left): Partner and Director of Operations - Marc Gayle; Co-Founder/Creative Director/Writer, Kia Moses; Creative Coordinator and Copywriter - Lindsey Lodenquai; and Co-Founder/Creative Director/Graphic Designer - Jordan Moses.
One of the bags made by Those Creative People Tings.
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A group of imaginative young entrepreneurs has been gearing up to fill the void anticipated from the impending government ban on single-use plastic items, which is slated to take effect today.

The operators of the fledgling business entity, Those Creative People Tings (TCP Tings), which is known for its signature line 'One Bag Ah Tings', have created stylish tote bags to replace plastic or 'scandal' bags, commonly used by shoppers.

The bags, which were launched recently, are being marketed under the company's 'Scandal-Free' line and provide consumers with a trendy and durable alternative to scandal bags.

They sport a range of interesting branding depictions, which, it is anticipated, will serve to bolster the Government's drive to withdraw plastic bags from the market.

These include: 'Nuh Inna Di Scandal', 'Scandal Free Life', and 'Not Ah Scandal Bag'.

 

Dynamic Team

 

The dynamic four-member team, whose products can be viewed and purchased on their website - www.tpctings.com - comprises founders and creative directors, Kia and Jordan Moses; creative coordinator and copywriter Lindsey Lodenquai; and partner and director of operations, Marc Gayle.

Gayle says that the 'Scandal-Free' bag line has received positive public feedback, citing a recently held Moda Market in Kingston where the product was introduced, among the testing grounds.

"We tested it there and the reaction was crazy, we were completely sold out on the first run. We have customers begging for more bags. We have received great feedback from our customers that our totes are durable and can hold a [fairly sizeable] amount of things," Gayle said.

He noted that steps have been taken to ensure that none of the company's products negatively impact the environment, noting that the members are environmentally conscious, which influences their operations.

"We do what we can and, as we grow, we'd like to do a lot more. Part of our proceeds from the sale of our classic totes collection is donated to the ongoing 'Nuh Dutty Up Jamaica' campaign," Gayle informed.

He further indicated that the company tries to exercise its environmental responsibilities by limiting the use of plastic in its production process.

"One of the things that we've debated amongst ourselves is not using plastic in our packaging. So we decided, early, to use cloth strings and paper tags to label our bags, as well as package them in paper bags," Gayle outlined.

While acknowledging that this is costlier and more labour-intensive, he said this, nonetheless, upholds the principle of their products being environmentally friendly.

"We are extremely supportive of the proactive measure the Government is taking to put our environment first and steer the country towards a more sustainable future," he added.

Gayle said the group is concerned about the extent of pollution caused by plastics, and how some persons in the society have become lackadaisical in their approach to solid waste disposal, particularly plastics.