Reducing brain drain

Published: Friday | May 20, 2011 Comments 0
Dr Orville Taylor, senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, in discussion with Bronhil Thompson (right), president of the Young Professionals Network of Jamaica (YPNJ), and Yaneek Page, founding president of the YPNJ. Occasion was the launch of the YPNJ's Skills Consortium held on Wednesday at the Council for Voluntary Social Services, Kingston. - CONTRIBUTED
Dr Orville Taylor, senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, in discussion with Bronhil Thompson (right), president of the Young Professionals Network of Jamaica (YPNJ), and Yaneek Page, founding president of the YPNJ. Occasion was the launch of the YPNJ's Skills Consortium held on Wednesday at the Council for Voluntary Social Services, Kingston. - CONTRIBUTED


  • YPNJ provides opportunities for young professionals

YOUNG professionals now have an opportunity to gain employment on a part-time basis, as the Young Professionals Network of Jamaica (YPNJ) on Wednesday launched its Skills Consortium.

The Skills Consortium comprises a cadre of skilled and experienced professionals (such as marketers, graphic designers, researchers, project management specialists, writers, accountants, paralegals, and proposal writers) who are available for employment on a part-time, short-term or on a project basis.

benefits

Professionals listed in the database are expected to earn income, expand clientele, and gain further experience, among other benefits.

Speaking during the launch, which was held at the Council for Voluntary Social Services, Dr Orville Taylor, senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, lauded the organisation for taking the bold step in establishing the Skills Consortium.

One of the aims of the YPNJ is to reduce the brain drain. "This organisation is the kernel of the success of this country. Politicians can create the framework, but it's up to you to take control of your destiny," Dr Taylor told the gathering of young professionals.

most successful

He noted that studies have shown that the most successful migrant group in South Florida is Jamaicans. He also reported that Jamaicans had the highest home ownership, employment levels and occupational status, among other things.

"This is what has happened, without any question the long-term migration has had a significant impact on the development of other countries," the sociologist said.

"Better leaders are migrating. What if these people had stayed in Jamaica to help run the country?" he questioned.

He added: "Leadership has to come from this generation of young professionals."

Meanwhile, Bronhil Thompson, president of the YPNJ, urged persons to join the consortium, in an effort to create opportunities for themselves.

In outlining the role of the Skills Consortium, Yaneek Page, founding president of the YPNJ, said the idea of the consortium emerged when Sandra Glasgow of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica suggested that a database of young professionals with specialised skills be created.

"This is a big day for the YPNJ. Finally we have found a solution. Young professionals are not saying to the Government, help us. We are finding solutions," Page said.


Share |

The comments on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gleaner.
The Gleaner reserves the right not to publish comments that may be deemed libelous, derogatory or indecent. Please keep comments short and precise. A maximum of 8 sentences should be the target. Longer responses/comments should be sent to "Letters of the Editor" using the feedback form provided.
blog comments powered by Disqus