Sun | Jul 21, 2019

LETTER OF THE DAY - GSAT symptom of system

Published:Wednesday | February 29, 2012 | 12:00 AM

THE EDITOR, Sir:

So GSAT is to be reviewed. That is good news, though I am not sure what is going to really be achieved in the final analysis.

In my opinion, there are two issues at play here: GSAT as a tool to assess a grade six student's knowledge and competence per his/her grade level; and GSAT as a tool to place students in a secondary-school system which appears to have different levels of success, evidenced by CSEC examination results.

I am a mother of two, and my experience with the GSAT curriculum aggravates me on two levels. First, it seems that GSAT emphasises trivia at the expense of the thorough understanding of mathematics and language arts. There really is nothing wrong with general knowledge, but when children are forced to cram information such as the second-largest lake in South America or the name of the third ship that Columbus sailed on, it leaves little time to ensure that the foundations of learning are properly crafted.

Second, with the volume of information these 11- and 12-year-olds have to memorise, little time is left to explore other areas of learning that are critical to building well-rounded, self-assured individuals. The end result is that the fun is sucked out of learning and the natural curiosities that lead to inventions, innovations and learning are snuffed out.

Thousands disadvantaged

The other issue is with GSAT as a placement mechanism. With just a few schools being deemed 'good' based on exam results at the secondary level, and thousands of children and their parents seeking entry to these 'good' schools, GSAT effectively acts as the selection tool.

Therefore, thousands of children who achieve average results (75-85 per cent) are made to feel like underperformers and placed in the 'not-so-good' schools.

The issue here is not that there is GSAT at all. The issue is Jamaica's educational system, where performance at the secondary level varies significantly from school to school, the better-performing institutions being far fewer in number than the underperforming ones.

The bottom line: No matter how you tweak GSAT, until performance increases across the board in our secondary schools, you will always have to screen and select in order to place children in the few 'good' schools. This is our reality, and our children suffer.

KELLY MCINTOSH

kkmac218@gmail.com