JCF confirms deceased cop was poisoned

Published: Tuesday | March 5, 2013 Comments 0

The police have confirmed that the death of former Senior Superintendent of Police Dathan Henry was due to poisoning by a mixture of chemicals usually found in rodenticides.

The result was confirmed following toxicological analysis of ante-mortem and post-mortem samples taken from Henry.

Last night, Karl Angell, director of communication in the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), said following confirmation of the cause of death, the toxicology report was submitted to police personnel at the Major Investigation Taskforce (MIT), who then consulted with the director of public prosecutions (DPP) for advice on the matter.

"The DPP then advised that the case file and all reports be submitted to the coroner for an inquest to be conducted. The MIT is currently in the process of preparing a complete case file for submission to the coroner," Angell said.

He confirmed that Henry's family was also contacted by the police and briefed on the development.

Angell's statement came after the results of the toxicology report were first revealed on The Gleaner's website earlier yesterday.

Henry died last year after a brief illness and the Police High Command soon after launched an investigation.

Warfarin in Henry's body

The Gleaner understands that at the time of his death, the senior superintendent had the substance Warfarin in his body.

Checks with online medical references show that Warfarin is an anticoagulant used to prevent the blood from clotting. It is also used as a pesticide against rats and mice.

Prior to Angell's statement, Superintendent Michael Phipps, head of the MIT, declined to comment on how the revelation would change the direction of the investigation.

Meanwhile, the family of the former head of the Clarendon police has indicated it would retained well-known attorney Delano Franklin.

Henry had served the JCF for 27 years.

livern.barrett@gleanerjm.com

 

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