Tue | Jun 27, 2017

Reform governance loopholes

Published:Saturday | May 3, 2014 | 5:00 AM

THE EDITOR, Sir:

The prime minister's contribution to the 2014 Budget was a thorough disappointment for the generation of attached Jamaicans (those mildly interested in the political process) now looking towards the United States (US) to satisfy their political appetite with cable news feeding themselves on colourful First World democracy and ideologies that influences their daily anti-government tweets and Facebook posting .

Madam Simpson Miller belongs to a generation which would have accepted such a unbecoming display of smoke and mirrors in a speech supposedly to inform the population of the People's National Party successes over the past two years, when, in fact, it was to spoonfeed party sympathisers (not loyalists) who may have been acting up because they fell prey to the new and improved charms of Prince Andrew "#AndrewOntheBus" Holness and the usual vigour of Audley 'Man-A-Yaad' Shaw.

BUREAUCRACY & CORRUPTION

In today's world of follow, share and like, our leaders and older politicians are still operating under the guise, 'those people won't understand, so they won't care'. Both sides are guilty of letting the governance loopholes slide that cause unaccountability and bureaucracy, hence corruption.

These loopholes are becoming too wide to ignore, especially now when we are fixing and tying loose ends of Jamaican society that have plague us for too long - the economy is a pillar but governance is the unstable foundation.

Some of the important questions looming that must be looked at as an important national and constitutional priority includes: federalisation, constitutional reform and oversight, term limits, campaign financing, removing MPs as ministers, voter ability to hold elected officials accountability (recalls), meaningful local government reform (leading to autonomy), third-party accessibility and many other governance practices that have succeeded in other countries we can mirror - individually or in bulk, either way we must act.

Too many people scoff at reforming the Constitution and Government, saying, "We nuh have time fi that people want money" and the politicians knowingly cradle this uniformed thought because they are afraid of losing power or even being held accountable for abusing it - they all want a seat or a ministry - but we know that the economy depends on good governance.

Madam Prime Minister, 'Balancing the books, while balancing people's lives' is honourable; if you're serious about people power, then truly return the power to the people allowing the foundation of governance to become modern, stable and balanced.

MARIO BOOTHE

m.raphael.b@gmail.com