Thu | Sep 16, 2021

Alisia Jarrett painting a bigger picture

Published:Saturday | September 11, 2021 | 12:10 AMKrysta Anderson - Staff Reporter
Meet Alisia Jarrett who goes by the creative moniker Khulula and Khulula Art.
Meet Alisia Jarrett who goes by the creative moniker Khulula and Khulula Art.
A closer look at Alisia Jarrett’s work titled ‘Nubian High’.
A closer look at Alisia Jarrett’s work titled ‘Nubian High’.
The artist dubbed this piece ‘Jameela’.
The artist dubbed this piece ‘Jameela’.
Always embracing different sizes, she honoured that universal love by painting ‘Beauty in Diversity’.
Always embracing different sizes, she honoured that universal love by painting ‘Beauty in Diversity’.
Paying tribute to  ethnic groups in Kenya, Jarrett celebrates the African culture with ‘Maasai Jump’.
Paying tribute to ethnic groups in Kenya, Jarrett celebrates the African culture with ‘Maasai Jump’.
A closer look at Khulula’s African Mask Collection.
A closer look at Khulula’s African Mask Collection.
Resonating in elegance and grace, Khulula recently debuted her first abstract painting.
Resonating in elegance and grace, Khulula recently debuted her first abstract painting.
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For many, art is meditation and freedom for personal expression. Art means peace. If Alisia Jarrett could describe art in one word, it would be alive. The entrepreneur recently reignited her first love after migrating overseas and has been painting her way forward ever since.

Jarrett officially embarked on her painting journey two months ago after sharing the artwork she designed for her home on social media. “The comments were so kind, and many suggested I sell my art,” she told The Weekend Gleaner.

With no intention at the time of putting her prized pieces up for sale, she continued to paint and make posts, and people began expressing interest and soon after began purchasing the artwork.

“I don’t even think I’ve taken it seriously yet. I just love creating and painting these wall arts. I created an Instagram page for Khulula Art, as my little art gallery, so persons may see (and purchase) my creations in one place,” the emerging artist reflected. On canvas, she plays around with bright colours, letting it flow freely from her heart. Initially using water paint, she graduated to acrylic paint, specifically drawing with acrylic paint pens.

Responsible for successfully staging the Curvy Caribbean Conference, the first plus-sized Caribbean conference here in Jamaica, Jarrett moved to the United States, leaving behind her artistic belongings. So she went shopping for some wall art to add personality to her new apartment. Discovering a few beautiful pieces out of her budget, the creative designer decided to make her own art.

Her do-it-yourself project included purchasing some supplies: canvases, paints and paintbrushes, and tried to create what she loves. “I actually surprised myself,” she said, noting that she was immediately a fan of her own work. “I was also shocked by how much I enjoyed painting. It was relaxing and meditative and took me to a space that became addictive.” Motivated by a spiritual awakening, you can see the African influences in all of the pieces.

As she grows and evolves in this art world, so too will her work. She names ‘Nubian High’ as one of her favourite bodies of art. It comprises coloured dots, a technique she finds most relaxing and fun. “’Nubian High’ is me. My mind is always on Africa, not necessarily the physical place, but that spiritual place where it all began. It speaks to the high that I get from being in that spiritual place. That piece speaks softly and loudly to me,” she said, revealing that she is very happy it has found a new home. She also experienced sheer bliss when painting her late husband Irvin ‘Carrot’ Jarrett’s drums. Painting the trio on a four by six canvas, she felt his spirit with her the entire time.

When people view her art, she hopes they are inspired to open their eyes, connect and feel the energy of love and peace that they were created with. And she is open to the limitless possibilities her work may bring. “I see limitless opportunities for my art, not just on canvases, but on paper prints, mugs, cushion covers, fabric designs, and clothing. For example, a dear friend saw my art on Facebook and asked to place them on T-shirts, so now Khulula Art Limited Edition T-Shirts can be found on IBIUBU.me. There really is no limit. I’m guided by my spirit. So let’s see,” she said.

She encourages other aspiring artists just to do what they love and let their art do the rest. Do it despite fear and listen to your inner voice. Be the author, the creator, and in everything that you do, do it all with love.

krysta.anderson@gleanerjm.com